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Banitsa (Баница; baitza or banica) is a traditional Bulgarian food, prepared by layering a mixture of whisked eggs and pieces of sirene (сирене; a special Bulgarian cheese) between filo pastry before baking it in an oven. It can be eaten both hot and cold.
During holidays such as New Years and Christmas, Bulgarians often hide charms such as fortunes or coins within the banitsa. The tradition can vary depending on the region. Usually, a coin is baked into the bread on Christmas and the elder of the family hands out pieces to everyone. It is said that whoever receives the piece with the coin is to have lots of fortune and wealth in the upcoming year. On New Years, little messages are baked into the bread, somewhat like an American fortunate cookie. Occasionally they will bake other charms into it, such as a small dogwood branch containing a single bud.
It is preferred to be eaten for breakfast, sometimes with yoghurt and other things. Several varieties includes banitsa based on spinach, milk, and even pumpkin—in which is referred to as tikvenik (Тиквеник).  

Banitsa (Баница; baitza or banica) is a traditional Bulgarian food, prepared by layering a mixture of whisked eggs and pieces of sirene (сирене; a special Bulgarian cheese) between filo pastry before baking it in an oven. It can be eaten both hot and cold.

During holidays such as New Years and Christmas, Bulgarians often hide charms such as fortunes or coins within the banitsa. The tradition can vary depending on the region. Usually, a coin is baked into the bread on Christmas and the elder of the family hands out pieces to everyone. It is said that whoever receives the piece with the coin is to have lots of fortune and wealth in the upcoming year. On New Years, little messages are baked into the bread, somewhat like an American fortunate cookie. Occasionally they will bake other charms into it, such as a small dogwood branch containing a single bud.

It is preferred to be eaten for breakfast, sometimes with yoghurt and other things. Several varieties includes banitsa based on spinach, milk, and even pumpkin—in which is referred to as tikvenik (Тиквеник).  

  1. dropthe808 reblogged this from obichambalgariya and added:
    So yummy. I miss the smell of fresh banitsa in the morning. Can’t wait to be back in the homeland.
  2. heyitscharchar reblogged this from obichambalgariya
  3. femmeviva reblogged this from solipsistictendencies
  4. antigoneweareyoung reblogged this from sweetteaforme
  5. sweetteaforme reblogged this from fakjumather and added:
    id love to try diff regional pite.
  6. dawnstarpony reblogged this from asenathemotherwolf
  7. keep-it-halaal reblogged this from fakjumather
  8. binaa-binaa reblogged this from fakjumather
  9. solipsistictendencies reblogged this from fakjumather and added:
    That’s interesting. We call all of them börek and just add a descriptive word like “sigara” böreği which is one of my...
  10. asenathemotherwolf reblogged this from solipsistictendencies
  11. fakjumather reblogged this from solipsistictendencies and added:
    In Bosnia we only call burek for pita that have meat in it. Everything else is pita, and all of these pite (plural) can...
  12. lesbianlegbreaker reblogged this from asyayay and added:
    Asya reports: #um no guys that’s actually BÖREK #uhm yeah it’s turkish ;) ;) But I just think it looks delicious.
  13. shadetheblue reblogged this from seriffluoride
  14. seriffluoride reblogged this from asyayay
  15. khlozer reblogged this from spavala
  16. spavala reblogged this from asyayay and added:
    I never understood people who say “cheese burek”, we call the one with meat “burek”. If it has cheese, it’s “sirnica”...
  17. therebedragonshere reblogged this from asyayay and added:
    1. Yes, do a post! 2. I learned that Bulgaria and Turkey share lots of foods when I found out a Bulgarian friend loved...
  18. ticklemysnitch reblogged this from asyayay and added:
    //
  19. asyayay reblogged this from invictascientia